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Size Chart

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Chest
    (cm)
    74
    to
    77
    78
    to
    81
    82
    to
    85
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    Waist
    (cm)
    59
    to
    62
    63
    to
    66
    67
    to
    70
    71
    to
    74
    75
    to
    78
    79
    to
    82
    Hip
    (cm)
    83
    to
    86
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Chest
    (cm)
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    98
    to
    101
    102
    to
    105
    106
    to
    109
    Waist
    (cm)
    73
    to
    76
    77
    to
    80
    81
    to
    84
    85
    to
    88
    89
    to
    92
    93
    to
    96
    Hip
    (cm)
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    106
    107
    to
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Approximate values)

A day in London

with

Alec Doherty

Alec Doherty x CLOSED
Alec Doherty x CLOSED

Alec Doherty is a London-based illustrator, painter and jewellery designer. Born in 1987, Alec’s work is inspired by his youth in the nineties and noughties. We talked to him about growing up in the northeast of England, the sustainable aspects of his work and overcoming creative hurdles. Alec also tells us about his favourite places in Europe – and shares what has changed after Brexit.

Plus: We’re super excited to share that a joint capsule collection with Alec is coming this summer! He’s giving us a little preview.

Alec Doherty x CLOSED
Alec Doherty x CLOSED

The
Interview

You started out as an illustrator. How did you get into designing jewellery?

It was totally by accident. I shared my old studio with different people. One of them was making jewellery. I wanted a little pinky ring for myself, couldn’t find one and asked her if she could make one for me. She gave me a piece of wax, and said, “give it a go yourself”. I made a ring, people would say, “Where did you get that from? Could I have one?” and it evolved from there. I think the most important thing is just to start and try something. You never know what you can be good at or who you meet along the journey. I’ve never thought of myself as an illustrator – rather just as someone who is creating things. Illustration evolved from drawing pictures. I studied to be a graphic designer and got into illustration, again, by accident.

Your first jewellery designs were inspired by mood rings with temperature-changing stones – super popular in the nineties. What fascinated you about them?

I like the idea of this constant flux in life, constant changes in emotional states. I also like the tacky nature of classic mood rings – there’s something beautiful and accessible about it. A lot of times when creating something, I come back to a place of adolescence, maybe because that’s a time that you’re quite free – and quite lost. The mood rings were also a reflection of that period.

You grew up in the northeast of England. What was that like in the nineties?

I am one of seven kids. All my brothers and sisters would go out to parties, listening to a lot of music. It seemed like a very joyous period. I was born in 1987, so I was quite young and maybe naïve to the realities of what was happening in the world. When you’re making something, you go to a place where you feel inspired. And that for me is a period that I go back to.

You mostly use reclaimed silver and gold for your jewellery pieces. How important is sustainability to you?

Sustainability is massively important to what I do. It should be the top of everybody’s agenda – that’s how we are going to remain on the planet. I am aware that I am creating something that has no practical use – jewellery is a luxury. We are adding more things to the universe and it is important to me to use sustainable materials whenever it is possible. Our material is not always reused, but it is always as ethically sourced as possible.

Was sustainability also the reason why you decided to produce locally, in the old jewellery quarter Hatton Garden in London?

It was definitely one of the reasons. I also like to know what’s happening. I’m interested in the process of how things are made, and I like to be able to have a conversation in person with people. It also massively affects transport means, costs and emissions – I can often go just on my pushbike and drop things off. And I believe in local community. Hatton Garden has hundreds of jewellery workshops – casters, finishers, lots of different skillsets.

How does the process of creating a piece of your jewellery work from start to finish?

I create a sketch and then I carve it into a lump of wax. The wax goes off to the casters, they cast it. It’s a millennia-old process, called lost-wax process. When it’s cast, I will finish it, with the help of my assistants. We make a prototype from the first one with the finish that we want, and then we remould that, and then that goes into the workshop for production.

What do you do when you don’t feel creative?

Creativity turns off sometimes. If I have something that I need to do and the tap is off, I abandon the studio, go on a walk, to a café or see people. It helps to give myself some distance and come back with a fresh set of eyes.

What are your favourite places in London?

There is no specific place; I love the city as a kind of a beating heart of its own. I like the museums and art galleries, the great markets, fantastic restaurants, local cafés, old record stores. I love the parks, especially the Heath – a beautiful place to be in and reflect.

Where do you like to go in Europe, do you have any favourite cities?

I love Paris, Berlin, Rome. The variety of spaces and landscapes in Europe is incredible. I love being on the sea, having access to the sea. So, if it was a favourite spot, in the Aegean Sea on a little Greek island is where I would like to be.

What else comes to your mind when you think of Europe?

Life is like you’re a vessel, and everything is an opportunity for learning. Europe means that there’s an incredible library on your doorstep. There’s so much going on in Europe, so many different cultures, different ways of thinking about things, different views. You could access five different countries in the same day, and multiple different countries in a week. All the learning opportunities and life experiences that this gives you are incredible.

When you think about yourself, do you identify as a European, or would you say you’re English?

Both. My dad is of Scottish and Irish descent, and my mom is of Indian and Irish descent. I was born and grew up in England, it’s helped form part of my identity and I love the place. I think that’s what an Englishman is – and I think that it’s a European identity as well. We’re all kind of nomadic. By default, I am a European. And I think being a European is a very good thing, in a sense of it being a union of people with different ideas and identities.

What has changed for you since Brexit?

The big thing is the feeling of polarization in this country now. The divisions have been amplified. My business has also been affected by Brexit – getting goods is more difficult and expensive and I don’t export to many countries. But I think we’ll get over those things. That’s relatively easy to sort out in the bigger picture, while the divisions are harder to mend.

We can’t wait for our collection with you! Could you give us a little preview?

It’s about reflecting on the years that we’ve had in lockdown in this Covid world – and about the world opening up again, us opening up emotionally, being able to get back out into the world, seeing people and making connections. There are going to be two pieces of jewellery with faces, which are reflective of the emotional states that we’ve been through. There’s excitement, but there’s also a bit of trepidation as well. It feels fitting for a spring/summer launch – from the dark to the light.

You started out as an illustrator. How did you get into designing jewellery?

It was totally by accident. I shared my old studio with different people. One of them was making jewellery. I wanted a little pinky ring for myself, couldn’t find one and asked her if she could make one for me. She gave me a piece of wax, and said, “give it a go yourself”. I made a ring, people would say, “Where did you get that from? Could I have one?” and it evolved from there. I think the most important thing is just to start and try something. You never know what you can be good at or who you meet along the journey. I’ve never thought of myself as an illustrator – rather just as someone who is creating things. Illustration evolved from drawing pictures. I studied to be a graphic designer and got into illustration, again, by accident.

Your first jewellery designs were inspired by mood rings with temperature-changing stones – super popular in the nineties. What fascinated you about them?

I like the idea of this constant flux in life, constant changes in emotional states. I also like the tacky nature of classic mood rings – there’s something beautiful and accessible about it. A lot of times when creating something, I come back to a place of adolescence, maybe because that’s a time that you’re quite free – and quite lost. The mood rings were also a reflection of that period.

You grew up in the northeast of England. What was that like in the nineties?

I am one of seven kids. All my brothers and sisters would go out to parties, listening to a lot of music. It seemed like a very joyous period. I was born in 1987, so I was quite young and maybe naïve to the realities of what was happening in the world. When you’re making something, you go to a place where you feel inspired. And that for me is a period that I go back to.

You mostly use reclaimed silver and gold for your jewellery pieces. How important is sustainability to you?

Sustainability is massively important to what I do. It should be the top of everybody’s agenda – that’s how we are going to remain on the planet. I am aware that I am creating something that has no practical use – jewellery is a luxury. We are adding more things to the universe and it is important to me to use sustainable materials whenever it is possible. Our material is not always reused, but it is always as ethically sourced as possible.

Was sustainability also the reason why you decided to produce locally, in the old jewellery quarter Hatton Garden in London?

It was definitely one of the reasons. I also like to know what’s happening. I’m interested in the process of how things are made, and I like to be able to have a conversation in person with people. It also massively affects transport means, costs and emissions – I can often go just on my pushbike and drop things off. And I believe in local community. Hatton Garden has hundreds of jewellery workshops – casters, finishers, lots of different skillsets.

How does the process of creating a piece of your jewellery work from start to finish?

I create a sketch and then I carve it into a lump of wax. The wax goes off to the casters, they cast it. It’s a millennia-old process, called lost-wax process. When it’s cast, I will finish it, with the help of my assistants. We make a prototype from the first one with the finish that we want, and then we remould that, and then that goes into the workshop for production.

What do you do when you don’t feel creative?

Creativity turns off sometimes. If I have something that I need to do and the tap is off, I abandon the studio, go on a walk, to a café or see people. It helps to give myself some distance and come back with a fresh set of eyes.

What are your favourite places in London?

There is no specific place; I love the city as a kind of a beating heart of its own. I like the museums and art galleries, the great markets, fantastic restaurants, local cafés, old record stores. I love the parks, especially the Heath – a beautiful place to be in and reflect.

Where do you like to go in Europe, do you have any favourite cities?

I love Paris, Berlin, Rome. The variety of spaces and landscapes in Europe is incredible. I love being on the sea, having access to the sea. So, if it was a favourite spot, in the Aegean Sea on a little Greek island is where I would like to be.

What else comes to your mind when you think of Europe?

Life is like you’re a vessel, and everything is an opportunity for learning. Europe means that there’s an incredible library on your doorstep. There’s so much going on in Europe, so many different cultures, different ways of thinking about things, different views. You could access five different countries in the same day, and multiple different countries in a week. All the learning opportunities and life experiences that this gives you are incredible.

When you think about yourself, do you identify as a European, or would you say you’re English?

Both. My dad is of Scottish and Irish descent, and my mom is of Indian and Irish descent. I was born and grew up in England, it’s helped form part of my identity and I love the place. I think that’s what an Englishman is – and I think that it’s a European identity as well. We’re all kind of nomadic. By default, I am a European. And I think being a European is a very good thing, in a sense of it being a union of people with different ideas and identities.

What has changed for you since Brexit?

The big thing is the feeling of polarization in this country now. The divisions have been amplified. My business has also been affected by Brexit – getting goods is more difficult and expensive and I don’t export to many countries. But I think we’ll get over those things. That’s relatively easy to sort out in the bigger picture, while the divisions are harder to mend.

We can’t wait for our collection with you! Could you give us a little preview?

It’s about reflecting on the years that we’ve had in lockdown in this Covid world – and about the world opening up again, us opening up emotionally, being able to get back out into the world, seeing people and making connections. There are going to be two pieces of jewellery with faces, which are reflective of the emotional states that we’ve been through. There’s excitement, but there’s also a bit of trepidation as well. It feels fitting for a spring/summer launch – from the dark to the light.

Drag & swipe to read

Alec Doherty

Alec Doherty

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